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Cricket Idioms and Sayings - The Idioms Dictionary

To Be Cricket – to play fair, to use gentlemanly conduct (usually used in the negative) The way that the government treated the union leader was not cricket. Sticky Wicket – an awkward situation (from the game of cricket where rain makes it difficult to bat or play on the field)

8 Cricket Idioms that are used in ... - English with a Twist

2. be cricket – to play fair, to use gentlemanly conduct (usually used in the negative) Example: “The way the CEO treated the Finance Director was not cricket” 3. to hit someone for six – to surprise or shock someone Example: “When Sally told Charles she was leaving him, it hit him for six“ 4.

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Cricket - Idioms by The Free Dictionary

Cricket - Idioms by The Free Dictionary. a cricket on the hearth. A sign of good health and good fortune. I'm putting this cricket statuette here because a cricket on the hearth is supposed ... holy crickets. it's just not cricket. it's not cricket. jiminy cricket.

Crickets - Idioms by The Free Dictionary

Crickets - Idioms by The Free Dictionary. a cricket on the hearth. A sign of good health and good fortune. I'm putting this cricket statuette here because a cricket on the hearth is supposed ... holy crickets. it's just not cricket. it's not cricket. jiminy cricket.

LetThemTalk Paris: English Idioms from Cricket

Cricket has also left its mark on the language here are 5 common English phrases originating from the game of cricket. 1. To bowl over. meaning: To be astonished, greatly surprised and excited, left speechless.

Cricket Idioms - Image Results

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Cricketer - Idioms by The Free Dictionary

Unsportsmanlike, unfair, dishonorable. Eric Partridge traced this term to 1867 but believed it was not widely used until the early twentieth century. Among the early references in print is Stanley Houghton’s 1914 play, The Partners, “. . . but it is not playing the game. In other words, Cynthia, it is not cricket.”.

Glossary of cricket terms & sayings

Numbers 1 and 2 open the innings (number 1 faces the first ball), number 3 comes in at the fall of the first wicket, and so on down to number 11, who comes in when nine wickets have fallen. Typically, numbers 1 to 6 are specialist batsmen, the wicketkeeper bats at 7, followed by the specialist bowlers.

What are the idiomatic expressions which come from the ...

I've heard people use the following and I am guessing they all came from Cricket. 1. Getting on the front foot : Meaning to take control of the situation. 2. Playing on your back foot: Indicating the going has gotten tough / unfavorable situation. 3.
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